Collections › OSMG Collection › Cups and Saucers

Cups and Saucers

Artist/Maker:
Schaffner, Heinrich
Place Made:
Salem North Carolina United States of America
Date Made:
1835-1850
Medium:
lead-glazed earthenware
Dimensions:
DIA (cup) 4 1/2; HOA (cup) 2 5/8
Accession Number:
145 a-b
Description:
DESCRIPTION: Two cups and two saucers, all lead glazed earthenware; golden yellow glaze with small green leaves as decoration. DIA (saucer) 6″; HOA (saucer) 1-1/4″ Marked HS on the bottom.

Heinrich (Henry) Schaffner son of Jacob and Mary Schaffner. He was born March 28, 1798 in Switzerland and died June 24, 1877 in Salem. He married Lavinia Hauser (first wife) and Emilia Meinung (second wife). He had Two children by his first wife: Maria Catharina and John Francis. He had three children by his second wife: Louisa Carolina, Sarah Elisabeth and Cornelia Lisette.

History:
MAKER: Heinrich (Henry) Schaffner son of Jacob and Mary Schaffner. He was born March 28, 1798 in Switzerland and died June 24, 1877 in Salem. He married Lavinia Hauser (first wife) and Emilia Meinung (second wife). He had Two children by his first wife: Maria Catharina and John Francis. He had three children by his second wife: Louisa Carolina, Sarah Elisabeth and Cornelia Lisette.

“Schaffner…arrived in Salem in 1833. An industrious sort, Schaffner was placed with John Holland but shortly found that he could not remain in that situation and applied for permission to open his own shop. He was allowed to purchase the old 1766 [Builder’s House] near the northwest boundary of Salem, the members of the Collegium stating at the same time that they [regretted…that Schaffner could not take over the pottery altogether in Holland’s place; the latter shows little zeal in carrying it on.] Schaffner carried on what evidently was an excellent trade in both fancy and utilitarian wares, though his shop increasingly had to compete with inexpensive and readily available imported ironstone and other such manufactured ware. The heyday of the potteries in Wachovia had occurred in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, when there was no competition from the outside. Nonetheless, Schaffner’s pottery continued to operate until the end of the century – after the 1870’s in the hands of Schaffner’s former apprentice, Daniel Krause, who was Salem’s last potter.” (Bivins & Welshimer, p.38-39)

Credit Line:
Old Salem Purchase Fund