Collections › OSMG Collection › Unidentified Woman

Unidentified Woman

Artist/Maker:
Vogler, Elias Alexander
Place Made:
Salem North Carolina United States of America
Date Made:
1845-1855
Medium:
watercolor on ivory
Dimensions:
WOA 1 1/4; LOA 1 3/4
Accession Number:
3215.3
Description:
Miniature portrait on ivory of a young woman. Subject is fair complexioned with short dark hair and brows, blue eyes. She is wearing a gold necklace with a cross-shaped pendant. Painting has been cut down. Leather case is not original. Glass mount has been placed over painting by conservator.

Elias Alexander Vogler (1825-1878), son of silversmith John Vogler, was a talented artist himself. Elias was born in Salem but traveled to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, at the age of fourteen to study at the prestigious Moravian boys’ school, Nazareth Hall. There he perfected his drawing and painting skills. It was in Pennsylvania that he learned the art of miniature painting.

Once he returned to Salem, Elias worked at various times as a silversmith, architect, sign painter, cartographer, and he owned a retail shop. The miniatures he painted survive as a testament to his skill at capturing likenesses.

History:
Elias Alexander Vogler (1825-1878), son of silversmith John Vogler, was a talented artist himself. Elias was born in Salem but traveled to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, at the age of fourteen to study at the prestigious Moravian boys’ school, Nazareth Hall. There he perfected his drawing and painting skills. Although we do not know exactly who taught Elias Vogler the art of miniature painting, in a letter written by Francis Shober from Salem to his brother Charkes Shober (in Bethlehem,PA), Francis writes, “Louisa is getting taken in a different way (painted) by Elias Vogler who learned it under a certain person who was here.” (March 1, 1844, letter filed with Shober Papers)
Once he returned to Salem, Elias worked at various times as a silversmith, architect, sign painter, cartographer, and he owned a retail shop. The miniatures he painted survive as a testament to his skill at capturing likenesses.