Old Salem Blog

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    As days for a February stroll go, this one is hard to beat

    02/23/17

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    When our life and health have been preserved and property protected, when our town has met with no misfortune, when industry and faithfulness in our calling have not been without reward, when fields and meadows have been fruitful and productive, when we have lacked neither food nor clothing, when peace and quiet have prevailed in our borders, when undisturbed we have enjoyed the rights and privileges guaranteed by the constitution of our country, then we recognize anew the Hand that is ever lifted in blessing, the Eye that watches constantly over the children of men, and we thank the Lord whose goodness endureth forever.

    - Salem Memorabilia, 1825, Records of the Moravians in North Carolina. Volume VIII: 1823-1837

    02/23/17

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    This ladle is inspired by a similar one in the Old Salem Collection that was made by Salem gunsmith, Timothy Vogler (1806-1896). The recipient was his sweetheart, Charlotte Hamilton, from the Hope Congregation, who became his wife.

    The original, from the 1830s, was made from half of a coconut. It has a turned wood handle with a silver ferrule attached to a heart design that joins the handle to the shell. Unlike the original, the coconut in the new ladle is lined with silver and the heart is enhanced with repoussé engraving. It has a turned black walnut handle that is from a very old tree in Salem that Timothy Vogler would have seen because it grew close to his home on South Main Street and was taken down only about a decade ago.

    This gift was created especially for Ragan Folan, President and CEO of Old Salem Museums & Gardens, February 2012 – December 2016, with sincere thanks and abundant appreciation from the Old Salem staff for her exceptional leadership and remarkable inspiration. Ladle: Nat Norwood and Blake Stevenson; Presentation box: Joanna Roberts; and Presentation bag: Linda Hancock.

    02/22/17

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    On this day in 1780 in Salem:

    Feb. 22. (Auf. Col.) It was suggested that as wheat is scarce and
    high a bread of mixed flour and corn-meal, or corn-meal alone, should be furnished to guests at the Tavern. Further, that it would be worth the trouble to try to raise spelt, as it is not so much in danger from weevils.

    It was remarked that if we are asked to take part in the next
    election of Assembly-men we should send several Brethren to the election, for it is our duty to participate in anything that pertains to the welfare of the country.

    - Salem Board Minutes, Records of the Moravians in North Carolina. Volume IV: 1780-1783

    02/22/17

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    February 20, 1782:

    “The meat-oven and raised hearth will be built in the Brothers House. The additional sleeping-hall can be secured to better advantage by using the top floor of the Brothers House, now a garret. The heat from the roof can be relieved by building dormer windows. It will be for the boys and supervisors.”

    Minutes of Salem Boards

    02/21/17

  • On housing Freedmen after the Civil War:

    Board of Trustees, Salem Congregation, Sept. 8, 1868:

    “…the claims of a common humanity, not to say Christian duty towards fellow human beings, … would demand that we extend a helping hand to them in enabling them to provide suitable home for themselves and families in their new situation, and not to leave them, as is unfortunately the case in too many instances, at the mercy of individuals who ask rents for dwelling far beyond their ability to pay.”

    Source: C. Daniel Crews, Neither Slave nor Free: Moravians, Slavery, and the Church that Endures,1998 p.38

    02/17/17

  • Striking Archaeological Gold in Old Salem

    Images of the newly discovered archaeological site in the yard of the Boys’ School from the Winston-Salem Journal

    02/10/17

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    A surprising find

    As part of our Boys’ School Restoration Project, grading began on the area behind the school building where an out building and an outdoor classroom will be reconstructed. During the grading, a gold dollar from 1851 was found by a Frank L. Blum Construction Company employee, who alerted the Old Salem Archaeology Department. During the ensuing excavation, a historic privy shaft was discovered that is providing interesting archaeological information. So far, we’ve uncovered bottles (including one for Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup, which was sold from 1849 until the early 1900s), slate pencils, animal bones, coins, and more. The items most likely date from the mid-19th century.

    02/09/17

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    Wesley Washington Fries

    Wash Fries was born in Salem and enslaved to Wilhelm Fries. He was baptized August 5, 1845 at the African Moravian Church. Fries worked in the F. & H Fries Woolen Mill in Salem.

    02/09/17

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    David Drake

    This jug was made by David Drake, one of the many slaves who worked on the pottery plantations of Edgefield County, South Carolina. Dave was first owned by Abner Landrum (1780-1859), who has been credited with establishing the first pottery, Pottersville, in the Edgefield district during the 1810s.

    Of the nearly 3000 enslaved craftsmen who have been identified by Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, Dave is the only one whose work we can positively identify. Despite laws prohibiting literacy among slaves, Dave was taught to read and write. His pots–more than 150 signed examples are known–testify to both his literacy and his skill as an artist. Once freed at the end of the Civil War, he adopted the more formal appellation “David” and the last name “Drake,” after one of his earliest owners.

    See more at: http://mesda.org/item/collections/jug/21266/…

    Experience yourself: http://www.oldsalem.org/…/…/african-american-heritage-tours/

    02/08/17

Sunset at Miksch House & Garden ...

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Perfect day for a pooch photo shoot in preparation for our Mutts in the Meadow event on April 30th. #dogsofoldsalem ...

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"When our life and health have been preserved and property protected, when our town has met with no misfortune, when industry and faithfulness in our calling have not been without reward, when fields and meadows have been fruitful and productive, when we have lacked neither food nor clothing, when peace and quiet have prevailed in our borders, when undisturbed we have enjoyed the rights and privileges guaranteed by the constitution of our country, then we recognize anew the Hand that is ever lifted in blessing, the Eye that watches constantly over the children of men, and we thank the Lord whose goodness endureth forever."

- Salem Memorabilia, 1825, Records of the Moravians in North Carolina. Volume VIII: 1823-1837
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Old Salem Museums & Gardens updated their cover photo. ...

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From our friends at Reynolda House Museum of American Art, learn more about the residents of Five Row, the first African-America community at Reynolda.

#BlackHistoryMonthOldSalem #BlackHistoryMonthWinstonSalem
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J.D. Spease and Betty Ruth Warren in Five Row, c. 1950. Five Row, the African-American community at Reynolda, was first occupied in 1916 and lasted until 1961 when the houses and other buildings were demolished to make way for Silas Creek Parkway. #BHM #BlackHistoryMonth #ThrowbackThursday #TBT For more info on the lives at Five Row, visit our blog post at www.reynoldahouse.org/connect/community/post/the-people-of-five-row Image: J.D. Spease and Betty Ruth Warren standing in opening of low hedge at the foot of a paved walk, c. 1950 Photograph 5 x 7 in. Estate Archives [www.reynoldahouse.org/collections/object/jd-spease-and-betty-ruth-warren-standing-in-opening-of-l...]

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The Town of Salem
THE TOWN
OF SALEM

Experience early American history in the unique Moravian settlement of Salem. Original structures, gardens, tours, artifacts, hands-on workshops, fun family events and shopping.

GARDENS AT
OLD SALEM

Stroll through award-winning restorations that create a landscape reminiscent of early Salem where utility, practicality and beauty united. Tours, workshops and plants for your garden.

MESDA

View history through objects and material culture. Tour a wide range of early southern artistry, craftsmanship and stories found in the world class collection of decorative arts from the early American South, 1660-1860.

Old Salem Museums and Gardens, 600 S. Main Street, Winston-Salem, NC 27101 Phone: 336-721-7300 | visitwinstonsalem.com